Has government become our god?

Politics has certainly got interesting recently… but there’s an underlying trend that is alarming me. And that is, we are putting a lot of hope in it that I think should be put in god, and we’re putting a lot of responsibility on it that should be put on ourselves. Here’s a blog I wrote for Christianity magazine on this, but I think there will be more to come.

Is politics part of the church’s mission?

Apologies for the long delay since my last post. I actually spent several months researching this article on politics – it felt a very important subject and I wanted to make sure I was doing it justice. It’s been on my mind a lot following Brexit and Trump. Many Christians, especially those in the ‘elite’ of the church in this country (eg media, heads of denominations etc), passionately think that Christians should get involved in politics, and are often quite left-wing. The reverse is the case in the US, obviously. But is this what Jesus wants? The article explores this question. It helped me to make up my mind on the subject, but I hope I am being fair to all sides. Let me know your thoughts!

Political tribalism: whose side are you on?

I am interested in politics, but it worries me how tribal it is. As if one side has all the answers. I guess I used to be very tribal – a real leftie. But I’ve learned the error of my ways. Do you hate any political parties? UKIP? Socialists? Anyone?

It’s not that I don’t think Christians should be into politics, but the minute we start throwing stones at the other side, we need to stop and think. Here’s a comment piece I wrote for Christian Today: “Why political tribalism is bad for the soul”

One quote:

I don’t think it’s the political colour that matters – people just generally like to move in tribes, and once we are in that tribe, the terrible temptation is to condemn and look down on others. We all do it, but it poisons our hearts.

 

 

UKIP on the campaign trail in Newark

I visited a UKIP rally for the Newark by-election: this is my report for the Spectator blog.

After the European elections, we can smell blood,’ said a cheerful UKIP activist, Scott Cross, from Hampshire. Former Tory activist Steve Stanbury, who defected to UKIP a few years ago, felt ‘exhilarated and invigorated for the first time in ages.’ And this exuberance was given full vent when their saviour Farage appeared. Entering the packed 500-plus crowd in Newark’s genteel Kelham Hall, the ovation was standing and the roar was deafening. The grand Victorian hall is usually used for weddings, but marital celebrations had nothing on the enthusiastic applause from UKIP’s blue rinse brigade yesterday, still buzzing from their triumph in the EU elections a week earlier.